March links: Remembering Suzette Jordan, the India’s Daughter fracas, Jerry Seinfeld and more

Why Suzette Jordan’s voice mattered: Suzette Jordan leaves an enormous absence, but hopefully, it’s one that we will fill with the necessary conversations about how to survive as a woman in a society that’s being struck by a backlash against women who are wriggling out from under patriarchy’s thumb. Our statistics for violence against women may not seem as bad as those of countries like America, but the levels of misinformation and victim-blaming in India are depressingly high. We need to talk about rape and harassment responsibly and sensitively, so that understanding is furthered instead of stigma. In the cacophony … Continue reading March links: Remembering Suzette Jordan, the India’s Daughter fracas, Jerry Seinfeld and more

February links: Bad films, good films, Oscar grump, literary feuds and more.

I’d like to hold this wretched heat responsible for the fact that I completely forgot to put up links of published articles for the past couple of months. The way the temperature’s been rising, the only logical explanation for Mumbai’s weather is here in this Instagram post. But let us rewind to when the temperatures were less harsh and when less of my brain had molten into slush. Here are the links from February. Reviews of Shamitabh, Badlapur, Qissa and a running commentary of watching Roy‘s first-day-first-show. February was Oscar season, so here’s what we saw in the theatres from the … Continue reading February links: Bad films, good films, Oscar grump, literary feuds and more.

Talking movies: Fahrenheit 451, Blue Jasmine

For Banned Books Week, I wrote about the film, Fahrenheit 451: Truffaut’s film presents literature’s as a cultural keepsake. Simple or complex, realistic or surreal, fact or fiction, words and stories are a record of how the human imagination has arrived at its present form. As Montag says of his nightly reading ritual, “I’ve got to catch up with the remembrance of the past.” Truffaut and Bradbury suggest literature is like the mythical phoenix, which had healing powers and could rise out of its own ashes. Both fragile and resilient, literature seems simple enough to stifle. Ban it, and it … Continue reading Talking movies: Fahrenheit 451, Blue Jasmine

Links: Prisoners, Besharam, Gravity, About Time

It’s update time again so voila the film reviews, in the order they were watched: Prisoners: If anything, the idea of a film about child abduction set in a depressing, non-descript American town probably sounds a little off-putting to most. Add to that a father who, with righteous zeal and desperation, takes someone prisoner and tortures him because he’s convinced the police’s politically-correct, non-violent interrogations aren’t enough to make criminals spill their guts, and it’s not a film that screams ‘general entertainment’. But barring a few shots, Prisoners is precisely that. The ideological debates and philosophical frills are secondary. It … Continue reading Links: Prisoners, Besharam, Gravity, About Time

The Mag This Week

Right. Links. In the Books page this week: Saikat Datta reviews No Easy Day by Mark Owen and Counter Strike by Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker. An exclusive excerpt of Mridula Koshy’s forthcoming book, Not Only The Things That Have Happened. Harper Collins is bringing out the novel in November (which means you should see it in bookstores in a couple of weeks. That is, if you’re fortunate enough to live in a place that has bookstores). The excerpt is about a character named Saramma, who has decided she’s returning to her family for good after having been a rich man’s sexual keep. … Continue reading The Mag This Week