Links: RK Narayan, Mumbai Film Festival e-book and more

These are all from October, which started off as a rather bookish month, courtesy the Booker prize shortlist. Not that there was anything particularly unworthy about the novels in the shortlist, but somehow, they didn’t feel quite as fantastic. Or maybe it’s just me growing increasingly senile or brain-melt thanks to prolonged exposure to Bollywood.

This year’s Booker prize went to The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan.

Also on the subject of literature, on 10th October, I went online in the morning and discovered RK Narayan’s face where the Google logo tends to be. For reasons best known to tech wizards, the Indian Google Doodles are the dullest and most unimaginative of the lot. Narayan’s Google Doodle was a case in point. Still, it did alert me to the fact that it was Narayan’s birthday and I wrote this.

My review of The Judge, starring Robert Downey Jr and Robert Duvall.

For once, I loved everything about Aamir Khan’s Satyamev Jayate. It was well-researched, had a stellar set of guests and was so full of triumph. What a great episode on alternative sexuality.

This year’s Mumbai Film Festival turned out to be a rather eventful affair. First it was on, then it was almost cancelled before finally coming together at the last minute. It wasn’t as fantastic a selection as the past couple of years, but there were still some fantastic films. This free e-book has all the pieces I wrote on the films that I saw as well as a little diary of what happened at the festival this year.  (Includes bits and bobs on CourtComing HomeMommy, Boyhood and more.)

My review of Happy New Year. No prizes for guessing how much I enjoyed it.

Gone Girl isn’t a bad film, but it is disappointing, especially if you’ve read the book. The film just doesn’t have that same tautness or crackle. And it doesn’t help that it clings to misogynist stereotypes in a way that would make leeches break out in a slow clap.

My review of Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, which is simply charming.

Jake Gyllenhaal has a talent for playing creepy guys and that talent is in fantastic display in Nightcrawler.  One helluva thrillier, this one and it’s particularly interesting if you’re a journalist.

 

Links: Naming names, Apple Watch, Deepika Padukone vs TOI and more

If you thought bad movies are all that turn me into the wordy version of Angry Birds, think again. The police raid a hotel, discover an actress moonlights as a sex worker. They release her name to the press. Her “high profile” clients, however, remain anonymous and shielded from the public gaze.

More cheerfully, what Bollywood thought of yesterday, Apple creates today. Case in point: Mr India’s Device versus the Apple Watch.

Deepika Padukone picked a fight with The Times of India, and at least as far as the court of public opinion is concerned, Padukone won. She was helped by the fact that Bombay Times’s attempt at defending itself was way more tasteless than the original tweet against which Padukone (or her social media manager) had initially objected. 

While ISRO’s mission to Mars got off to a jubilant start, it was a good occasion to remember fondly how often the red planet has popped up in books and movies. 

The first UN report on gender and the film industry made for interesting reading. It turns out  that according to their analysis, India is the only country in which film jobs for female characters revealed only a small difference from real world statistics. Woohoo!

Is there a film in your book? Bollywood certainly hopes so. 

A new season of Satyamev Jayate began last week and it was a lovely, heartwarming episode in which Aamir Khan showed viewers the transformative powers of sport. If only he and his research team had thought of looking eastwards, beyond mainland India, while putting the episode together. 

JK Rowling put out an anagram-flavoured tweet, disclosing a little bit about the project she’s currently working on, on October 6th. It took a day or so for the Internet to react, but once it did, everyone, including Rowling, seem to have had a lot of fun. So, as marketing ploy, how does that compare to a full-page ad in The Times of India?

Links: Reviews, Oscar drinking game, snubs and more

This round-up is long overdue and I’ve been delaying this only because I’m not sure how to organise two-pages worth of links. So now I’m biting the bullet and dismissing any prospect of organisation. These are just links, in no particular order.

The Lego Movie is, without a doubt, one of the most awesome movies I’ve seen. (Spaceship! Spaceship! Spaceship!) (Everything is awesome!) Sure, it’s product placement, but it’s also adorable and very, very clever. And maybe even a little subversive.

Recently, The Times of India published an article that said Aleph had recalled copies of On Hinduism by Wendy Doniger from bookstores in Bangalore. It’s not quite clear what’s happening with On Hinduism because Aleph has only issued an odd, confusing statement. However, the Doniger affair began with Penguin deciding to withdraw and pulp existing copies of her book, The Hindus. More on freedom of expression here.

Marathi cinema is seeing something of a resurgence, after having been squashed and starved by Hindi blockbusters. One of the films that proves this renaissance is the gorgeous and heartbreaking Fandry.

A review of Gunday, which is perhaps the most graphic Bollywood bromance I’ve seen.

Nishtha Jain’s documentary on activist Sampat Pal, Gulabi Gang, is an interesting documentary on Pal and her organisation. There’s always so much eager to attack men and families that are strangers or unrelated. When it’s one of the Gulabi Gang’s own who is involved, everything becomes more complicated.

My review of Highway, a film that I thought was ok right after watching it. In hindsight, the more I think about it, the less I like it, particularly the end where the victim of a kidnapping imagines herself and her kidnapper as children, gambolling around a picturesque countryside. Because you know, that’s what kidnap is: child’s play.

Honestly, I wasn’t expecting great insight from Shaadi Ke Side Effects, but neither did I expect the film to unravel as much as it did.

There’s a new season of actor Aamir Khan’s talk show, Satyamev Jayate, on Indian television.

A quick compilation of the best film nominations at the Oscars and a list of some of the films that the Oscars snubbed this year.

Alexander Payne’s Nebraska, which is slow but just such a wonderful, contemporary look at Americana. He’s so good at capturing family dynamics and making the seemingly dysfunctional reveal itself as strangely endearing.

Ok, I admit I liked watching the Oscars as a kid. I got up at the crack of dawn and took great joy in the fact that I was in my jammies while the red carpet stars had to scrub themselves into their high fashion. But let’s face it, not only have the Oscars revealed themselves to be the product of much lobbying, even the dresses aren’t as much fun as they used to be. Remember JLo wearing a dupatta held together by a brooch? Tilda Swinton in her kaftan? Now the Oscars is the kind of do to which someone like Lady Gaga comes wearing a totally regular dress. So disappointing. However, since I’d have to get up and watch it, I figured a drinking game was the best way to make Oscars fun.

Two pieces on Gulaab Gang: a review and a piece that was written when the Delhi High Court initially agreed with Sampat Pal’s claim that Gulaab Gang was defamatory.

By far the best chick flick I’ve seen come out of Bollywood is Queen, with Ranaut delivering a brilliant performance (and superb dialogues) as a young Dilliwali who conquers Europe and herself.

Queen-Photo